Shoulder to Shoulder Conference

 

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Scroll down to view the schedule of keynote and workshop presentations available.

Select '+' next to the title to view the description and speaker bio. Handouts will also be available a few weeks before and following the conference date. To view the handout, scroll to the specific presentation and select 'View Handout.'

To download a one page flyer of the conference schedule, select 'View Printable Agenda.'

Previous year's conference information can be found on the About Us/History page.

Pre-Conference Event5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

expandA Conversation About Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and Why it Matters

Downstairs Ballroom

Please join us for the 7th Annual Pre-Conference Event. There will be opportunities to network, socialize, enjoy beverages and hors d'oeuvres with our inspiring and engaging keynote speaker, Rekah Strong.

Doors open at 5 PM with our keynote speaker beginning at 6 PM.

Come learn about how to have conversations around this topic and why these conversation are important especially when working with families connected to child welfare. The presentation will go over definitions and terms and what they really mean. There will be time to reflect on how it applies to your personal and professional life. Finally, we will identify what are some next steps and tools that you can use to support diversity, equity, and inclusion work related to child welfare.

Speaker(s): Rekah Strong, MSW

Rekah Strong, MSW is currently the Executive Director of Educational Opportunities to Children and Families, which is the largest provider of Early Learning Services in the Southwest Washington region. Rekah has had over 20 years of experience working in social services including the former Chief of Operations and Equity with United Way, developing policy for State of Oregon’s (DHS) child welfare system to close the disparity gap for Native and African American children, and Clark County as the Chief Diversity Officer. She understands the direct impact of cultural competence and service delivery. The first 13 years of her career was spent in case management and providing culturally relevant services to children and families.

Rekah has spent the past 7 years of her career focused specifically on diversity and equity at the policy and mezzo organizational level. She holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice with an emphasis on African American Studies and a master’s degree in Social Work Administration from Portland State University. Rekah is currently working on her PhD in Social Work Research. She has completed her course work and is preparing for her dissertation titled (Moving Diversity and Inclusion from Theory to Practice).

Rekah has almost 2 decades of experience working with public agencies and developing strategies to improve organizational cultural humility. Rekah has conducted training for local universities, non-profit, government, public school, and private sector organizations. She effectively demonstrates, how the value of diversity and equity, has a positive impact, on every companies bottom line. Rekah volunteers her time as the first African American person appointed as a Clark College Trustee by Governor Gregoire, Clark County Disability Board, and We Reign Youth Foundation. She is also the proud mom of six kiddos.

Morning Keynote8:45 am - 9:45 am

expandMaking Sense of Fragmented Lives

Grand Ballroom

Coming to Oregon all the way from the U.K., world renowned therapeutic life story practitioner Richard Rose will offer an overview of his unique life story work process, while giving the audience a window of understanding into the philosophy of his approach. Richard is an engaging, thought-provoking and delightful speaker who continues to engage and enlighten audiences all over the world, including Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Portugal, China, Russia, Canada, Scotland, England and now Oregon.

Speaker(s): Richard Rose, AAP, MBA, BPhil, PGSWE, PQCCA, CQSW

Richard Rose AAP, MBA, BPhil, PGSWE, PQCCA, CQSW is the Director of Child Trauma Intervention Services Ltd (CTIS). Richard undertakes consultancy and training on Life Story Therapy and working with 'hard to reach' children and adolescents; and develops academic training programs in the UK and internationally. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor of Social Work and Social Policy at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia and an Honorary Associate of Berry Street, Australia and a Honorary Associate of the Institute for Open Adoption at University of Sydney, Australia. Richard works with children and their carers in out of home care and family placements to assist understanding and attachment with the aim of enabling placements to become healthy and nurturing for all involved. He oversees certificate and diploma programs in Therapeutic Life Story Work in multiple locations in the UK, Australia, and in Oregon in the USA. Richard’s signature approach is also in the process of becoming an evidence-based practice.
Richard is the author of The Child’s Own Story - Life Story Work with Traumatised Children (2004), Life Story Therapy with Traumatised Children - A Model for Practice (2012) and Innovative Therapeutic Life Story Work: Developing trauma-informed practice for working with children, adolescents and young adults (2017).

Session A10:00 am - 11:00 am

expandMaintaining Self in Community and College

Washington

This workshop will explore the importance of self-care and community-building as tools for success in college with hands-on activities such as reflection, meditation, and a Q/A session

Speaker(s): Cinnamon Spear

Cinnamon Spear is a word warrior from the Northern Cheyenne Reservation in Montana. With a rez education from home and two Ivy League degrees from Dartmouth, she's become a cross-cultural communicator who bridges the gap between Indian country and the rest of the world.

Cinnamon is a recent Iowa Writers' Workshop graduate and teaching fellowship recipient. By infusing Native American studies, creative writing, and her own wisdom traditions, Cinnamon decolonized the classroom and cultivated young writers in an Indigenous-centric learning environment. She believes that writing fosters healing and is committed to facing hard truths in order to bring about change.

As a child, Cinnamon lived in a foster home for a short period and a group home on multiple occasions while her parents fought to overcome their alcohol addiction. She openly shares her stories in hopes that it helps those who need to hear it.

Cinnamon's beadwork, creative writing, documentary film production, and oral storytelling combat harmful stereotypes and cultural appropriation by offering refreshingly honest, self-representation on behalf of herself and her people.

expandAttachment and Why It Matters Part 1 of 2

Clackamas

This two-part workshop will focus on the recent advancements in understanding Attachment Theory and how a child's developing brain is influenced by early relationships. Attachment disruption, which is typical in children involved in the child welfare system, has lasting and significant impacts. Ways to help mitigate the negative impacts of attachment disruption will be discussed, with concrete tools for healing at the center of discussion. Techniques for parents, caregivers and caseworkers will be reviewed. A deeper understanding of attachment-based needs and behaviors will be explored.

Speaker(s): Leah Brookner, MA, MSW, PhD

Leah Brookner, MA, MSW, PhD is a professor in the School of Social Work at Portland State University - her classes focus on youth development, family systems, adoption, trauma, attachment and effective therapeutic techniques for complex families. Prior to her work at PSU, Leah was a child and family therapist, specializing in the counseling of children in foster care. Her role working directly with foster youth prompted her to expand her practice to working with adoptive children and families. Leah then spent over five years training, assessing and supporting adoptive families using a trauma-informed and attachment-centered focus. Leah's passion continues to be centered on adoption of children with trauma histories by strengthening supports for parents and caregivers. As a professor/trainer, her style elicits participation, and critical thinking with a bit of laughter along the way.

expandTransracial Adult Adoptee Discussion Panel

Multnomah

This panel offers a rare opportunity to listen as five adoptees have an open and honest conversation about our lived experiences as Transracial Adoptees. You will have a chance to hear our recommendations and insights first hand as we share our stories.

We will be discussing:

  • The Impact of Being Transracially Adopted in our communities
  • How RACE & RACISM played a role in our identity formation
  • The discovery of our RACIAL AWARENESS and racial competency
  • The DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES OF OUR RACIAL IDENTITY and how it has changed over time.
  •  

    Speaker(s): Astrid Castro

    Astrid has a degree in sociology with an emphasis in adoption. For twenty plus years, she has traveled the country to lead youth groups, present workshops on transracial parenting, talking with children about adoption and various other workshops focusing on adoption. Prior to creating Adoption Mosaic, Astrid worked in both the private and public sectors of various adoption organizations such the Oregon Post Adoption Resource Center (ORPARC), Holt International, Rocky Mountain Adoption Exchange to name just a few.

    Astrid's personal experiences as an adoptee, a woman of color, and growing up in a white family and community, fuel her professional path to helping others. Astrid is aware of the benefits of post-adoption services for individuals and their families and seeks to bring these services to the adoption community. Her life-long interest in adoption is rooted in her own adoption at the age of four from Colombia (along with her older sister). Astrid has been in reunion since December 2012 with her birth family in Colombia.

    When Astrid is not working she loves to spend time with family, friends and enjoying the adventures of life as the mama of an amazing teenage daughter.

    expandRelative Caregivers & Navigating Triangulation

    Weyerhauser
    View Handout

    Relative caregivers have the joy of playing an important role in the life grandchildren, nieces, nephews and other family members. They also find new challenges that they may not have expected, especially that of being the middle of relationships in conflict. This often leads to triangulation and manipulation as children or parents try to get the caregiver to do what they want them to do!

    This workshop is designed to help kinship providers who are fostering, adopting or acting as guardian to navigate and circumvent triangulation.

    Speaker(s): Tim Boettcher, MA, MS Ed

    Tim Boettcher has been training foster parents in various regions of the state of Oregon for the Child Welfare Partnership of Portland State University since 2016.  This is a dream job for him which allows him to use his past experiences as an Oregon DHS caseworker, a classroom teacher and surrogate caregiver.  Tim is an adult Third Culture Kid and having lived most of his life in Asia and Europe he has experienced multiple transitions as a child and adult. He has worked with children and families for over 25 years.

    expandThe experiences and needs of LGBTQ youth in foster care

    Zellerbach

    This workshop will cover the experiences and needs of LGBTQIA2S+ youth in foster care and specific considerations for working with transgender foster youth, inclusion, support, health needs etc.

    Bridge 13 community education training is designed to address root causes of discrimination impacting the LGBTQIA2S+ community and to create affirming spaces for LGBTQIA2S+ people of all ages. The Bridge 13 curriculum is broad in scope and covers topics related to sexual orientation, sex, gender identity, and gender expression. Participants gain a deeper understanding of the barriers that individuals face and take away tangible skills to create more accessible and equitable services.

    Speaker(s): Seth Johnstone

    Seth Johnstone is the LGBTQ Education Specialist for the Bridge 13 Community Education Project at SMYRC (Sexual and Gender Minority Youth Resource Center). In addition to facilitating equity trainings, Seth holds a staff role at SMYRC's resource center, working with and being inspired by queer and trans young people. Seth believes deeply in the role that community education can play in motivating people into action, awakening empathy, building alliances, and developing robust and accessible resources.

    expandIntroduction to Collaborative Problem Solving

    Overton (St. Helen's)

    When young people are exhibiting challenging behaviors, we frequently get flustered, and not necessarily because of the safety needs but because of how we are making meaning of their behavior. With the Collaborative Problem Solving approach, we start with the foundation rooted in everyone's inherent goodness that people, including kids, do well if they can. Grounded in the research in neuroscience and with a more accurate understanding of why they are misbehaving, we then support our young people through the stressors they face in a manner that teaches mutual respect, develops the thinking skills needed to prevent the problems, and nurtures our relationship with them.

    Speaker(s): Ted Layman, LCSW

    Ted specializes in Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS), an evidenced based practice strongly rooted in the latest neuroscience that has been shown to improve parent-child relationships, develop skills in children when conventional behavior modification models have not, and shown to reduce symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder as well as parenting stress. Ted particularly enjoys assisting parents at feeling more confident and competent in connecting with their children and managing their challenging behaviors. When asked by people what he does for a living his answer is: "I teach adults how to listen to children."

    Ted is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. He earned his B.A. in Social Work and his Masters of Social Work from Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Ted holds certification in the Collaborative Problem Solving from Think:Kids based at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA. From time to time he travels across the country conducting CPS trainings for professionals at mental health organizations and schools.

    For 12 years, Ted has been working with at-risk youth and families in a variety of rural and urban clinical settings including juvenile justice, substance abuse, outpatient mental health, violence prevention outreach, foster care, residential, home-based mental health services, primary care behavioral health, and private practice. Ted is licensed to provide clinical supervision for CSWA's in licensure track in the state of Oregon.

    Ted enjoys hiking, backpacking, bicycling, exploring the Portland's neighborhood life, and gardening. He lives in NE Portland with his wife and son (when he is home from college).

    http://www.restoretherapypdx.com/about/ted-layman-lcsw/

    expandManaging Meltdowns Through Play: Building connection with children experiencing sensory issues

    Pettygrove (St. Helen's)
    View Handout

    This presentation will focus on:

  • Understanding how children's brains and bodies work together to find calm
  • Activities to strengthen relationships and trust with you as the caregiver
  • Connecting while setting limits
  • Playful tools for building routines + managing meltdowns
  • Creating a portable sensory first-aid kit
  • Take-home activities to strengthen relationships
  • Speaker(s): MereAnn Reid, MA

    MereAnn Reid is a licensed professional counselor intern, specializing in adoption, child development & child therapy, play therapy, parenting and family counseling. I've been working with adoptive families for over 12 years. After teaching in alternative schools and childcare programs, I worked as a CASA (court-appointed special advocate) for kids in the Oregon foster care system before completing a master's degree in counseling psychology. I worked in community mental health and elementary schools before launching my private practice in 2009. While I don't see adoptive families exclusively, a majority of my clients are touched by adoption in some way, and I'm grateful to them for helping me develop an informed perspective on the layers and phases of adoptive and foster family life for everyone involved. I've directed after-school and summer youth programs, led adoption support workshops, and developed training for foster families and adoption agency staff. I've provided family support at the Oregon Post-Adoption Resource Center, served on the Board of Directors of the Oregon Association for Play Therapy and created workshops for Adoption Mosaic. I volunteer with Baby Blues Connection as a speaker on post-partum; post-adoption mood disorders and am active with A Home Within, serving youth living in foster care.

    Session B11:15 am - 12:15 pm

    expandCommunicating and Direct Work with Traumatized Children

    Washington

    Richard's training builds on tools from his ingenious and world-renowned life story work approach, offering supportive and usable communication techniques for all types of caregivers & workers to use while engaging and connecting with children who have experienced hardships and trauma. Numerous, creative approaches will be covered and practiced with opportunity if time allows to ask questions. Richard's techniques can be easily applied for use with children AND with adults!

    Speaker(s): Richard Rose, AAP, MBA, BPhil, PGSWE, PQCCA, CQSW

    Richard Rose AAP, MBA, BPhil, PGSWE, PQCCA, CQSW is the Director of Child Trauma Intervention Services Ltd (CTIS). Richard undertakes consultancy and training on Life Story Therapy and working with 'hard to reach' children and adolescents; and develops academic training programs in the UK and internationally. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor of Social Work and Social Policy at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia and an Honorary Associate of Berry Street, Australia and a Honorary Associate of the Institute for Open Adoption at University of Sydney, Australia. Richard works with children and their carers in out of home care and family placements to assist understanding and attachment with the aim of enabling placements to become healthy and nurturing for all involved. He oversees certificate and diploma programs in Therapeutic Life Story Work in multiple locations in the UK, Australia, and in Oregon in the USA. Richard’s signature approach is also in the process of becoming an evidence-based practice.
    Richard is the author of The Child’s Own Story - Life Story Work with Traumatised Children (2004), Life Story Therapy with Traumatised Children - A Model for Practice (2012) and Innovative Therapeutic Life Story Work: Developing trauma-informed practice for working with children, adolescents and young adults (2017).

    expandAttachment and Why It Matters Part 2 of 2

    Clackamas

    This two-part workshop will focus on the recent advancements in understanding Attachment Theory and how a child's developing brain is influenced by early relationships. Attachment disruption, which is typical in children involved in the child welfare system, has lasting and significant impacts. Ways to help mitigate the negative impacts of attachment disruption will be discussed, with concrete tools for healing at the center of discussion. Techniques for parents, caregivers and caseworkers will be reviewed. A deeper understanding of attachment-based needs and behaviors will be explored.

    Speaker(s): Leah Brookner, MA, MSW, PhD

    Leah Brookner, MA, MSW, PhD is a professor in the School of Social Work at Portland State University - her classes focus on youth development, family systems, adoption, trauma, attachment and effective therapeutic techniques for complex families. Prior to her work at PSU, Leah was a child and family therapist, specializing in the counseling of children in foster care. Her role working directly with foster youth prompted her to expand her practice to working with adoptive children and families. Leah then spent over five years training, assessing and supporting adoptive families using a trauma-informed and attachment-centered focus. Leah's passion continues to be centered on adoption of children with trauma histories by strengthening supports for parents and caregivers. As a professor/trainer, her style elicits participation, and critical thinking with a bit of laughter along the way.

    expandParent Advisory Panel

    Multnomah

    The Parent Advisory Council (PAC) was formed in 2015 to provide valuable insight and guidance to the executive leadership of Oregon Dept. of Human Services Child Welfare on strategies to improve the overall well-being of children and families. PAC members bring a personal perspective and insight regarding services they believe parents would participate in and value. In this workshop, the panel will discuss their current focus in working with child welfare: increasing child visitation, enhancing the engagement between caseworkers and parents, and improving hand-offs when caseworkers change.

    Speaker(s): Parent Advisory Panel - Facilitated by Brittany Kintigh, Panelists - Daniel Pallas, Leanne Walsh, Jamie Walsh, and Justin

    Brittany is the Program Manager at Morrison Child & Family Service's Parent Mentor Program. She supervises and trains Parent Mentors and is a certified facilitator of Parents Anonymous peer support groups.  Brittany provides leadership for the Parent Advisory Council of Oregon, an advisory board to the leadership of Child Welfare in the State of Oregon.

    Leanne is a member of the Parent Advisory Council. Child welfare became involved due to her drug abuse and unsafe conditions. She is 11 years clean - living and parenting without alcohol or drugs. She is grateful for the intervention & services provided to her family.

    Daniel is a member of the Parent Advisory Council since 2016. He is a grateful father in long-term recovery, since 12/2011. A father to three children: 12 & 8 yr old boys and a 3 yr old girl. He successfully navigated the child welfare system as a parent. His job is to help fathers navigate the system as a peer through support, encouragement and modeled behavior. He is a Certified Recovery Mentor and a Peer Recovery Counselor.

    Jamie is a parent in long-term recovery since 01/2014. Due to my addiction and domestic violence, my family was a consumer of the DHS Child Welfare system. Supportive services were put into place. I learned to how to parent well. Now, I support mothers navigating the system. I walk side by side with other women to help them create sustainable, lasting change in their lives that will benefit their families.

    Justin grew up in a dysfunctional, abusive home, using drugs to escape. His addiction and criminal record got worse. He was controlling & abusive when married. Child welfare stepped in after his first son was born. In 2012, Justin's son broke through. Justin took responsibility for his actions and life and completed treatment. Now over 6 years clean.

    expandFive Tips to Parenting Teens

    Weyerhauser
    View Handout

    Raising teenagers can be challenging for all parents and caregivers. Raising teenagers who did not grow up in your household understanding the established spoken and unspoken rules, and who are likely experiencing trauma can be even more challenging. These challenging feelings can quickly turn into what feels like an impossible task. How can caregivers keep their sanity and help teens thrive? This workshop will explore five tips to parenting teens that will center on relationship building, supporting healthy sexuality, the brain, and other topics with the hope of helping a caregiver improve on their ability to care for teens in their household.

    Speaker(s): Jose Maciel, BA

    Jose has been a trainer with Portland State University’s Child Welfare Partnership since 2017, focusing on training new Caseworkers, Social Service Assistance, English Speaking Caregivers and Spanish Speaking Caregivers throughout the state of Oregon. Jose received his Bachelor’s degree in Human Development and Family Sciences from Oregon State University. He spent six years with the Department of Human Services Child Welfare as a Child Protective Services worker prior to joining the PSU partnership. Jose is a bi-cultural and bi-lingual trainer who prides himself in providing culturally responsive presentations to the Latinx community.  

    expandYouth Empowerment Training

    Zellerbach

    We will be working to present the concept of youth voice in the context of trauma to foster empowerment and long term success. Friends of the Children's is a trauma informed program, serving youth in care who have experienced high levels of early childhood trauma. Youth with high levels of trauma often don't have positive or successful experiences in school and other settings. We work to empower youth to speak up and speak out. We will go over how to collaboratively set goals with youth, help to engage them in their communities, and help youth find a different story about themselves than they have been told before. We will discuss how to work on goals with youth over time and walk alongside them as they develop confidence and feelings of being competent and skilled individuals; we will include how to support youth in building long term relationships to activate a network to support themselves.

    Speaker(s): Rachel Pearl

    Rachel Pearl joined the Portland Chapter in December of 2017. Rachel came to Friends after working in the juvenile justice system for the past 20 years, developing programs for youth in the system. Her background consists of program research, design in the areas of youth empowerment and self-sufficiency. She is an expert in Strength-Based program development with an emphasis on youth voice. She is a skilled trainer in Restorative Principles in Program Design and Community Based interventions and has presented at conferences around the country. Rachel has a background in research and completed a thesis on the Exposure to Violent Death and the Relationship with current Risk Behaviors. Rachel is excited to work for Friends of the Children and use her skills and experience to prevent youth from ever ending up in the system. Prevention has always been her focus, and working at Friends allows her to work alongside such a talented and diverse group of people using a program model that works and has incredible outcomes. Rachel puts her efforts towards the goals of increasing graduates ability to be self-sufficient in life. Her favorite things about Friends of the Children is that the relationship with youth is "no matter what". The unconditional support is so unique and so greatly needed in a world which often alienates kids who come from challenging life experiences.

    expandDoes your Medicine Wheel have a Flat?

    Overton (St. Helen's)
    View Handout

    The Medicine Wheel is a traditional Native American self-awareness tool for measuring balance psychologically, physically. emotionally, and spiritually. As helpers, over long-term exposure to children and families in pain we may experience compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma because we care. According to Kitchen Table Wisdom by Rachel Naomi Remen M.D. "People who really don't care are rarely vulnerable to burnout. Psychopaths don't burn out. There are no burned out tyrants or dictators." Emotions are high when working with children as the stakes are high. Some of us may have our own triggers from childhood and as research is showing we carry genetic memory of our own family's trauma. Enhancing a sense of wellbeing can be accomplished by utilizing mindful techniques, developing self-care strategies, and promoting stress reduction and resiliency with a healthy well-rounded medicine wheel.

    Speaker(s): Lorraine Brave, MSW

    Lorraine Brave, MSW, is a Human Development Consultant with over 25 years' experience with Brave Transitions. She is an experienced facilitator in connecting people and team building in challenging situations as a mentor, coach, and liaison for management, faculty, and students. She has been building on the strengths of communities, families, and individuals throughout the US and Canada. She also has provided culturally competency and team building to various forms of government agencies including State, County, Federal, and Provence. She has been a guest speaker and member of numerous advisory committees at many college and universities, including New Zealand. Lorraine consults for individuals, teams, and groups drawing on their creative potential for change. Over the years she has witnessed the vicarious traumatic stress of those who work and care for others and the importance of self-nurturance in building resiliency.

    expandPreparing Children for Adoption

    Pettygrove (St. Helen's)

    In Coos County, we have historically offered classes to children on an adoption track to help prepare them for adoption. This workshop will provide information about the classes we offer for the children on our caseloads. We will talk about the fun activities we do with the children and the hard work we ask the children to do in the classes. We will also challenge you to think about ways you can help prepare children for adoption in your area.

    Speaker(s): Amy Durbin & Ashley Howell

    Ashley Howell has worked for Child Welfare for over 18 years. She has been doing permanency/adoption work for about the past 17 years.

    Amy Durbin has worked for Child Welfare for over 17 years and has been doing permanency/adoption work for about the past 10 years.

    Ashley and Amy inherited a legacy of strong adoption work in their county and have worked hard to continue to grow and improve that legacy. In 2012, both workers were both part of a team in Coos County that received the Director's Excellence Award for their work in adoption preparation with children. Both workers also received a similar award from The Coos County Commission on Children and Families in 2012 for this work.

    Lunch & Lunch Keynote12:20 pm - 1:45 pm

    expandFrom Dirt Roads to Ivy Walls: One Woman's Story

    Grand Ballroom

    Cinnamon Spear shares her life story: As a child, her parents struggled with alcohol addiction. She and her siblings spent time in foster care and group homes. Despite the challenges she faced at home and in these environments, she persevered. Cinnamon earned her bachelors and masters degrees from one of the country's best colleges and just completed her Masters of Fine Arts at the world's best writing program. Her story is sharp and honest and she hopes to inspire others.

    Speaker(s): Cinnamon Spear

    Cinnamon Spear is a word warrior from the Northern Cheyenne Reservation in Montana. With a rez education from home and two Ivy League degrees from Dartmouth, she's become a cross-cultural communicator who bridges the gap between Indian country and the rest of the world.

    Cinnamon is a recent Iowa Writers' Workshop graduate and teaching fellowship recipient. By infusing Native American studies, creative writing, and her own wisdom traditions, Cinnamon decolonized the classroom and cultivated young writers in an Indigenous-centric learning environment. She believes that writing fosters healing and is committed to facing hard truths in order to bring about change.

    As a child, Cinnamon lived in a foster home for a short period and a group home on multiple occasions while her parents fought to overcome their alcohol addiction. She openly shares her stories in hopes that it helps those who need to hear it.

    Cinnamon's beadwork, creative writing, documentary film production, and oral storytelling combat harmful stereotypes and cultural appropriation by offering refreshingly honest, self-representation on behalf of herself and her people.

    Session C2:00 pm - 3:15 pm

    expandTherapeutic Life Story Work

    Washington

    Life story work therapy is a hands on approach designed to enable children to explore, question and understand the past events of their lives while creating a coherent narrative of their life story. It aims to secure their future through strengthening attachment with their carers and providing the opportunity for children to develop a healthy sense of self and a feeling of well-being. Join Richard as he demonstrates his unique and creative therapeutic life story work approach, literally carried out and illustrated on wallpaper, that he has pioneered in multiple countries around the world.

    Speaker(s): Richard Rose, AAP, MBA, BPhil, PGSWE, PQCCA, CQSW

    Richard Rose AAP, MBA, BPhil, PGSWE, PQCCA, CQSW is the Director of Child Trauma Intervention Services Ltd (CTIS). Richard undertakes consultancy and training on Life Story Therapy and working with 'hard to reach' children and adolescents; and develops academic training programs in the UK and internationally. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor of Social Work and Social Policy at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia and an Honorary Associate of Berry Street, Australia and a Honorary Associate of the Institute for Open Adoption at University of Sydney, Australia. Richard works with children and their carers in out of home care and family placements to assist understanding and attachment with the aim of enabling placements to become healthy and nurturing for all involved. He oversees certificate and diploma programs in Therapeutic Life Story Work in multiple locations in the UK, Australia, and in Oregon in the USA. Richard’s signature approach is also in the process of becoming an evidence-based practice.
    Richard is the author of The Child’s Own Story - Life Story Work with Traumatised Children (2004), Life Story Therapy with Traumatised Children - A Model for Practice (2012) and Innovative Therapeutic Life Story Work: Developing trauma-informed practice for working with children, adolescents and young adults (2017).

    expandSustaining Ourselves: Workforce Wellness in the Face of Trauma

    Clark

    This workshop is for professionals who work with survivors of trauma, as well as lead staff and administrators who want to develop and sustain workplace cultures that are healthy for everyone. Participants will explore the impact of trauma on workers and organizations and develop trauma-sensitive strategies for supporting the health and well-being of staff and organizations serving survivors of trauma.

    Speaker(s): Elaine Walters, MS

    Elaine is is the founding Executive Director and lead trainer at the Trauma Healing Project, an organization that provides professional and community training and direct healing support for survivors. Prior to this position she coordinated the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Program for the Attorney General’s Sexual Assault Task Force in Oregon. For the last 25 years she has been a consultant, trainer and community organizer working to address and eliminate intimate violence. She has designed and facilitated workshops and trainings on many related topics and has provided direct services and support to youth and adults impacted by violence, abuse and other forms of trauma and oppression. She is involved in the effort to expand accessible trauma healing resources and to implement trauma-informed care practices regionally and state-wide.

    expandFASD and other Neurobehavioral Conditions: Understanding a brain-based approach

    Clackamas

    This presentation will include:

  • How the brain is impacted by pre-natal exposure to alcohol, other substances or trauma.
  • Discovering the source of behaviors: the brain.
  • Creating meaningful accommodations for those experiencing neurobehavioral conditions.
  • Parenting these children differently so there is greater hope and resiliency for the parenting journey.
  •  

    Speaker(s): Eileen Devine, LCSW

    Eileen Devine, LCSW has over a dozen years of clinical experience and is the adoptive mother of a child with fetal alcohol syndrome. She believes that kids do well if they can and that when we understand the way a child's brain works, we then understand the meaning behind challenging behaviors. Eileen's goal is to support parents in feeling more competent and confident in connecting with their child by parenting from a brain-based perspective. When this shift happens, both parent and child experience less frustration and more success in their relationship.

    Eileen is a certified facilitator in the teaching and application of the neurobehavioral model, as developed by FASCETS founder, Diane Malbin. She has also completed Tier 1 training in Think:Kids Collaborative Problem Solving. Eileen is an instructor for the Post-Master's Certificate in Adoption and Foster Therapy through Portland State University's Child Welfare Partnership, training other therapist on the neurobehavioral model.

    expandYouth Experience Panel

    Multnomah

    A panel of adolescent youth who have experienced foster care will take turns answering questions regarding their experiences being a part of the system. Together we will explore honest assessments regarding foster parents, caseworkers, and programs that the youth were able to participate in.

    Speaker(s): Miles Allen

    Miles Allen is the Associate Director of Partnerships & Resources at Friends of the Children Portland. He has been working with youth for 8 years, starting his career as a Teacher. After a craving for a more relationship based approach to youth development, he became a mentor at Friend of the Children. Miles served as a Friend for 5 years is now working as a Team Leader, supporting Mentors with youth in Foster Care. Miles has a Bachelors Degree in History and Political Science from the University of Oregon and a Masters in Secondary Education from Portland State University. In his free time he enjoys hiking in the Gorge, camp fires, playing with his cat, and spending time with family and buddies

    expandTimelines for Reunification

    Weyerhauser
    View Handout

    In Timelines of Reunification participants will learn the timelines in play from the point a child enters foster care up until reunification can be reached. This interactive module will dive into the importance of the child's team in helping meet milestones toward reunification.

    Speaker(s): Rose Cokeley and Jennifer Holman

    Rose Cokeley began her DHS in 2008, initially working in the self-sufficiency program in Linn County screening for program eligibility. In 2009 Rose began working in child welfare program as a caseworker in Polk County and later joined administrative work at Central Office in 2014. She is currently an Operations and Policy Analyst, serving in the role as the Caregiver Training Program Coordinator. In this role, Rose is primarily focused on caregiver training redesign, caregiver supports, and program development and implementation. Rose enjoys supporting the Oregon Foster Care Program with a focus on caregiver training and applying a macro lens to statewide work that impacts the families we serve. Rose has a bachelor's degree in psychology from Western Oregon University and a Masters Degree in Social Work from Portland State University.

    Jennifer Holman is the Reunification Program Manager for the Oregon Department of Human Services. She has worked for the state for the past 12 years as a caseworker, Permanency Consultant and Program Manager. She has an MSW from Portland State University. Before coming to work for the state she worked for Columbia University. Jennifer is passionate about families being together as they work through becoming safe and stable.

    expandTransgender and Gender Diverse Youth: Affirming Care in Youth and Family-Centered Environments

    Zellerbach

    This workshop is geared toward mental health providers, advocates, case managers, foster care/adoption evaluators, and family members who are supporting gender diverse youth in care. This workshop will:

  • Describe gender diversity and associated language/ terminology
  • Differentiate between sex, gender identity and gender expression
  • Explain the medical and mental health needs of transgender youth
  • Identify risk and resilience factors experienced by transgender communities
  • Describe the options for transition, including social, hormonal and surgical transition and describe ways to contribute to an environment of inclusion.
  •  

    Speaker(s): Jess Guerriero, MA, MSW

    Jess is a social worker with a second graduate degree in Gender and Cultural Studies from Simmons College. While at Simmons, Jess focused their work on a thesis that argued for the expansion of transgender health coverage and the movement toward therapists as partners, rather than gatekeepers, in the transition process. Jess interned/ worked at Fenway Health, a community health center geared towards LGBTQI-identified individuals. Here, Jess carried a caseload of children, adolescents, and adults who were, in some cases, navigating medical transitions. Jess also ran a support group for parents of trans youth and established an independent consulting business to help schools, businesses, and providers implement policies that were more trans-inclusive. Jess previously worked in Quality Management at LifeWorksNW, and served as an internal trainer at LifeWorks NW on LGBTQI-related topics and was the chair of the Transgender Care Workgroup. Jess is currently working as an Intake and Referral Specialist at OHSU's Transgender Health Program, helping to improve experiences for community members. Jess uses they/them pronouns.

    expandEnsuring Safety in Foster Care: Understanding Out of Home Assessments along with tips for before and during the process

    Overton (St. Helen's)
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    Out of home assessments are comprehensive child protective services (CPS) assessments conducted in response to reports of suspected child abuse in foster homes. The OHCA process is a stressful and challenging experience for all involved. Session attendees will learn about how the department receives a report of child abuse or neglect and, when it does, all the components and time lines of the comprehensive CPS assessment that follows. Attendees will learn what it means when a CPS assessment concludes with a disposition of Founded, Unfounded, or Unable to Determine and what happens next. This session will include discussion, tips for your toolbox, enhanced awareness of DHS expectations when conducting a comprehensive response to reports of child abuse and how to help caregivers navigate this process and receive the support caregivers deserve. This session will also include strategies caregivers can consider prior to having an OHCA.

    Speaker(s): Don Darland and Janna Owens

    Don Darland - Don and his wife Vicki have been fostering in Linn County since 1991. Don helped form the Oregon Foster Parent Association in 1996, and has served on the board in several capacities since its inception. Don teaches FP class on Allegation Prevention Strategies. Hobbies include hunting, fishing and grandchildren.

    Janna Owens began her career at DHS Child Welfare in 2002 and has always found her career to be fulfilling if not life changing. You will often hear Janna say that she has learned a great deal about compassion for the human experience given her journey with families who are touched by the child welfare system. She has been an Operations and Policy Analyst serving in the role of a Foster Care Coordinator for the last six years which includes various responsibilities from providing technical assistance, support, and consultation to the Metro Region of Oregon as well as Central Office foster care administration. Janna has held various positions within Child Welfare over the past 16 years, that of a child protective service worker, permanency work, certifier, foster parent trainer and supervisor. In her current role she particularly enjoys the depth and breadth of her involvement in the foster care program helping to create change not only for children who are placed in foster care but for our amazing foster parent community. Janna appreciates training community partners and welcomes the opportunity to collaborate on best outcomes for children and families. When Janna is not working you will find her enjoying her time with her family and dog, if not with her nose in a good book, doing yoga, traveling, connecting with nature and finding ways to support her community.

    expandAll I Know is How I Feel and This Behavior Freaks Me Out: Strategies for Minimizing Reactive Behavior in Your Children (and Yourself)

    Pettygrove (St. Helen's)

    Foster and adopted parents encounter trauma-driven behavior that expresses overwhelming fear, uncertainty, and the human need for heart-felt connection. It often comes in the form of emotional outbursts, food hoarding, defiance, lying, stealing, poor personal hygiene, perfectionism, indifference, and shut-down. Even when we are aware of the physiology that underlies our children's behavior, in the thick of it we aren't reasoning through the mechanics of adaptive neural circuitry, we are feeling. What we are feeling ignites our own fear response and we become reactive. In this workshop, we will briefly discuss how fear arises outside of consciousness and how it influences behavior. We will focus on practical ways of maintaining calm in the face of fear and integrating mindfulness as a tool to promote felt-safety and co-regulation.

    After completing this interactive workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize behavior as a response to nervous system arousal
  • Hold compassion for their own emotion around their children's behavior
  • Practice simple strategies for promoting internal calm ultimately resulting in greater self-regulation
  • Connect a greater capacity for self-regulation with felt-safety and improved behavioral outcomes for their children
  •  

    Speaker(s): Carol Monaco, MBA, MS

    I am a parent of five children adopted through foster care, a parenting consultant, writer, and advocate. I have a daughter in college, a son living in a residential treatment center, and a household that moves in the flow of the trauma current. Having experienced the depths of despair over behavior that I did not understand and could never seem to control, my work is focused on parenting with mindful self-compassion. I especially enjoy working with groups, witnessing the transformation that happens when we move away from blaming and shaming ourselves and into the space of acceptance and appreciation even as we stumble. I hold master's degrees in business administration and psychology. I have additional training in interpersonal neurobiology, adoptive and foster family therapy, neuroplasticity and contemplative practice, positive psychology, children's yoga, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, Reiki, Hand-in-Hand Parenting for professionals, Emotional Freedom Technique, and crisis intervention. I serve on OHA's Office of Addictions & Mental Health Division Children's System Advisory Committee.

    Unbuttoned Parenting (unbuttonedparenting.com)

    Session D3:30 pm - 4:45 pm

    expandGetting Kids in Sync: Creating sensory rich environments to support physical, emotional, and social development

    Washington
    View Handout

    In this workshop:

  • Participants will understand sensory processing and how the sensory systems support typical development
  • Participants will begin to identify difficulties which may be attributable to sensory processing disorders.
  • Participants will understand the impact of adequate sensory processing on attention, behavior, learning and social engagement.
  • Participants will learn tools to help children get in sync
  •  

    Speaker(s): Sharron Donnelly, MS, OTR/L

    Sharron Donnelly, MS, OTR/L,  is co-founder and owner of Advanced Pediatric Therapies.  Sharron has extensive training in a multitude of areas related to pediatric occupational therapy and child development and has worked in a variety of practice areas, including schools and private practice. Sharron holds a certificate in Infant Toddler Health from Portland State University.  Sharron is certified in administration of the Sensory Integration and Praxis Test and has trained extensively on sensory processing disorders.   Sharron has completed her certificate in the DIR Model and the Foundational Capacities of Development.  Currently, Sharron teaches nationally and internationally for Vital Links to train other professionals in Therapeutic Listening™ an auditory approach to treat Sensory Processing Disorders.   When not working, Sharron enjoys spending time with her two boys, reading, travelling, and running. Sharron is excited to present at this conference as she has a personal interest in sharing information with the adoption and foster community as her two boys are adopted.

    expandTrust-Based Relational Intervention, Tools for Connecting with Children from Hard Places

    Clark
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    TBRI offers strategies to help you build attachment and nurture your children's natural development. This workshop will introduce you to the TBRI Connecting and Empowering Principles. Connecting Principles offer specific and practical tools you can use with your children to disarm their fear and help them engage in nurturing, healthy relationships. Empowering Principles offer ways to anticipate and respond to children's ecological and physical needs to help them regulate their emotions and behaviors. TBRI Correcting Principles will be introduced in this workshop, those specifically related to providing structure and options for how to address fear-based behaviors parents observe in their children.

    Participants will learn how to:

  • Mindfully connect with their foster and/or adopted children to build attachment.
  • Use practical tools to engage with their children and reduce their children's fear responses.
  • Teach skills to their children for self-regulation, calming, and getting through daily routines.
  •  

    Speaker(s): Debra Penkin, MSW, CFLE

    Deb Penkin, MSW, CFLE, TBRI Educator, Practitioner, Northwest TBRI Collaborative Member - a professor at Warner Pacific University (WPU) in the Bachelor of Social Work program where she also serves as the Director of Field Education. She is a Trust-Based Relational Intervention (TBRI) Educator and is delighted to be at this conference. Debra teaches classes in child welfare, trauma, chemical and behavioral addictions, social work practice, mental health, and field education. She brings experience as an adoption worker in foster and international adoptions, addictions counselor, clinician in juvenile corrections settings, clinical private practice practitioner, program manager, trainer, etc. Debra is also an adoptive parent of two children. She is passionate about TBRI and is excited to share this model with her co-presenter. Debra believes that all parents can benefit from TBRI principles and she has seen first-hand how TBRI strategies have changed children's lives. As a trainer, Debra hopes to engage audience members in co-learning, having fun, and asking questions.

    expandA Disorganized Toddler in Foster Care: Healing and Change from an Attachment Theory Perspective

    Clackamas
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    Drawing from our book, Creating Compassionate Foster Care: Lessons of Hope from Children and Families in Crisis, we use an engaging case account to illuminate participants' understanding of children's attachment needs and ways to provide care for children with disorganized attachments. We will focus on the story of Rachel, a profoundly disorganized toddler, and the lessons she taught us about how we can better support the needs of children with compromised attachments. Experienced foster parent, Janet Mann, will share six principles of care (e.g. Behavior as need, Cues and miscues) that emerged from her work with Rachel. Our presentation reflects 20 years of experience in foster care, including developing an innovative foster care program, and will engage participants in dialogue and reflection as, together, we explore how to strengthen children and families.

    Speaker(s): Molly D. Kretchmar-Hendricks, Ph.D. & Janet Mann

    Molly D. Kretchmar-Hendricks, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology at Gonzaga University, where she teaches courses in developmental psychology, risk and resilience, and attachment theory. She received her Ph.D. in Child Development and Family Relationships from the University of Texas in 1995 and completed advanced training in parent-infant attachment. Her research emphasizes attachment-based interventions, and she was a research affiliate on the Circle of Security project. She has presented at multiple conferences and has published numerous articles as well as a book, Creating Compassionate Foster Care: Lessons of Hope from Children and Families in Crisis, with co-presenter, Janet Mann.

    Janet C. Mann, with her husband, Paul, fostered over 120 children and founded a model foster care program, The Children's Ark, serving as its director until she retired in 2009. She received her Bachelors degree from Scripps College, has advanced training in Infant Mental Health, and is certified in Circle of Security Assessment and Treatment. The Manns have received many awards including the Foster Parent Leadership Award from Children's Administration, Region One. She has presented at multiple conferences and has published several articles as well as a book, Creating Compassionate Foster Care: Lessons of Hope from Children and Families in Crisis, with co-presenter, Molly Kretchmar-Hendricks.

    expandJudge's Panel

    Multnomah

    A panel of judges from Clackamas, Marion, Multnomah and Washington counties discuss legislation effecting the courts, trauma related practices, and other court issues. A facilitated question and answer session will follow. Questions must be submitted in writing and will be collected during the workshop.

    Speaker(s): Judge Pellegrini, Jugde Karabeika, Judge Proctor, Judge Long, Facilitated by Leola McKenzie

    Judge Heather Karabeika is a circuit court judge in Clackamas County since 2013. Previously, she was a municipal court judge in West Linn, a criminal defense attorney in Clackamas County and a prosecutor for nine years. She currently runs the Clackamas County Mental Health Court program and also handles juvenile dependency matters in Clackamas County.
    Judge Kathleen Proctor is a Circuit Court Judge in Washington County since January 2019. She hears cases involving family law matters and private adoptions half time and juvenile dependency and delinquency matters half time. Early in her career as a lawyer, Judge Proctor served on a juvenile diversion panel in Clackamas County after receiving training in Restorative Justice.
    Judge Morgan Long is a judge for Multnomah County Circuit Court. Originally from Virginia, Judge Long attended Lewis & Clark Law School and dedicated the majority of her career to juvenile law. After a brief time working for the Washington County DA's Office in the juvenile section, she spent the majority of her career representing indigent clients in both the juvenile and adult courts. Judge Long is on multiple committees and work groups dedicated to bettering juvenile law for all participants.
    Judge Cheryl Pellegrini is on the Juvenile Court for the Third Judicial District in Marion County. Pellegrini began her career as a law clerk for the 13th Judicial District (Kalamath County). Then served as a prosecutor, handling a wide range of felony offenses, including sex crimes and aggravated murder. Over 19 years, she served in leadership positions. She was serving as Chief Counsel of the Trial Division when she was appointed to the bench in 2014 by Gov. Kitzhaber.
    Leola McKenzie has been with the Office of the State Court Administrator since January 1995; She is currently the Director of Juvenile and Family Court Programs Division for the state courts. Leola is an adoptive parent of two special needs children.

    expandWhat’s up with the hair? 2.0

    Weyerhauser

    A conversation about the psycho-social aspects of Black hair/skin care and its effect on black children involved in DHS child welfare.

    Speaker(s): Michelle Lewis, MSW, Dr. Shea A Lott, PhD, and Charles Hannah, MSW

    Michelle Lewis, MSW - My philosophical approach is humanistic encompassing anti-oppressive practice, empowerment theories, and the strengths perspective, which is used to inform my practice when working with individuals. My areas of clinical interest are working with anxiety/depression, grief/bereavement, addictive behaviors, and how race and racism intersect with mental health disorders. I believe that every human being has the ability, strength, and knowledge needed for healing. My job is to provide the tools and support needed to help people move towards living their lives in a way that meaningful to them.

    Dr. Shea A Lott - Dr. Lott is a clinical psychologist interested in social and cultural factors that impact the development of various psychological and behavioral disorders in African descent populations. His theoretical approach to treatment is a biopsychosocial approach. He has a particular passion for helping clients struggling with depression, anxiety, spiritual concerns, relationship problems, and attention difficulties.  Dr. Lott’s assessment interests are in the neuropsychological evaluation of adults and children with a wide range of diagnoses including traumatic brain injury, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities, and common childhood developmental and psychological disorders. In addition to clinical and assessment interests, Dr. Lott has been active in the education and supervision of graduate students and residents.

     

    expandTeens and Screens: How to help adolescents build empathy and connection in a digital world

    Zellerbach
    View Handout

    In this workshop, Yshai will explore and discuss the unique aspects of adolescent development in a way that demonstrates how this period makes teens and preteens particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of technology and social media. Yshai will also shed light on the realities of how devices are impacting our youth as well as how we, as caregivers, can help them get more out of the positive aspects of devices and less of the adverse effects. Workshop participants can expect a balanced approach to this issue in a way that's practical, enlightening and fun.

    Speaker(s): Yshai Boussi, LPC

    Yshai Boussi is a Licensed Professional Counselor and has been working with youth and families for 20 years. He is the founder of Portland Family Counseling, a therapy practice that specializes in helping children, adolescents, families and parents. His experience includes mentoring at risk youth, working in residential treatment facilities and leading intensive experiential workshops for at risk youth. As a systems trained family therapist since 2003, Yshai has worked extensively in community mental health settings as well as private practice. In addition to working professionally, Yshai also has personal experience as a foster parent and all of the blessings and challenges that come with that important role. Yshai is also a popular speaker and trainer, providing informative, fun and inspiring workshops for adolescents, parents, teachers, therapists and others who want to improve their ability to connect with and help those lovable young people who bring so much joy and intensity to our lives. You can learn more about Yshai and check out lots of free articles and tips for parents with adolescents at www.portlandfamilycounseling.com.

    expandDifferent, but not Abnormal

    Overton (St. Helen's)

    This workshop reviews the developmental issues of displaced children (those experiencing separation from biological parents). It analyzes and compares the development of foster and adopted children to children growing up in intact families. The objective of this workshop is to provide insight into the divergent nature of development for displaced children and youth within the context of generally accepted development theories.

    Speaker(s): Dennis Leoutsakas, PhD

    Dr. Leoutsakas, completed his studies at the University of South Florida with a degree in Social and Health Communication. The focus of his doctoral studies is a comparison of Western Orphan Literature to the experiences of those children separated from their biological parents. After receiving his degree in 2003, he continues to research displaced children and the out-of-home experience. He is a CASA residing in the Portland area.

     

    expandEvery Day Is a Celetastrophe: Building Resilience by Pausing to Notice What’s Going Well Even When It Feels Like It’s All Going Wrong

    Pettygrove (St. Helen's)

    Developmental trauma is expressed in the nuances of relationship. In the flurry of every day, our relationships with our children may feel stressful. This causes us to see catastrophe when the dishes aren't done, when the dirty clothes are hidden at the bottom of the unmade bed, and when last week's leftovers are found festering in the hall closet. Our perception is shaped by the things we pay attention to, and in the human brain, catastrophe counts for more. When we learn to stop and intentionally celebrate the positive, we build resilience. We experience less stress and we are more attuned in our relationships. In this workshop, we will learn strategies for incorporating intention, humor, reflection, and real-life positive experiences to celebrate joy amid the reality of every day.

    After completing this interactive workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the innate human bias toward negativity and its relationship with stress
  • Incorporate the art of the pause in interactions with their children
  • Utilize intention to notice feel-good moments like a playful joke, a great big hug, and Sunday morning snuggles on the couch
  •  

    Speaker(s): Carol Monaco, MBA, MS

    I am a parent of five children adopted through foster care, a parenting consultant, writer, and advocate. I have a daughter in college, a son living in a residential treatment center, and a household that moves in the flow of the trauma current. Having experienced the depths of despair over behavior that I did not understand and could never seem to control, my work is focused on parenting with mindful self-compassion. I especially enjoy working with groups, witnessing the transformation that happens when we move away from blaming and shaming ourselves and into the space of acceptance and appreciation even as we stumble. I hold master's degrees in business administration and psychology. I have additional training in interpersonal neurobiology, adoptive and foster family therapy, neuroplasticity and contemplative practice, positive psychology, children's yoga, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, Reiki, Hand-in-Hand Parenting for professionals, Emotional Freedom Technique, and crisis intervention. I serve on OHA's Office of Addictions & Mental Health Division Children's System Advisory Committee.

    Unbuttoned Parenting (unbuttonedparenting.com)